In the Beginning were Bats

Steve Barlow founded Wildlife Integration and began building Big Bat Houses for one reason: to bring people and wildlife together in a positive way. Growing up in north Florida Steve knew at an early age his life would be devoted to wildlife. After 5 years in the US Army Steve attended Pittsburg State University earning his B.S. in biology and chemistry he then transferred to The University of Florida where he earned his MS in Soil & Water Science and Wildlife Ecology.

Steve began designing and building bat houses at his first job with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission back in 1999. Later working for the US Fish and Wildlife Service Steve continued to develop a variety of design tweaks and installation techniques to create larger bat houses more conducive to public viewing. Through much trial and error bat houses became more successful at attracting bats and providing a quality wildlife viewing opportunity for the public.

Our latest design allows for the land manager, park ranger, or private landowner to easily purchase and install a community sized bat house. Which in turn provides one of the most spectacular wildlife viewing experiences on earth. This experience fosters a love of nature and bats in many people every year, making many local wildlife areas the highlight of their community. Thereby helping to accomplish our mission of bringing wildlife and people together in a positive way.

Stay in touch and connect with Steve on LinkedIn.

Certified seal by Bat Conservation International

Big Bat Houses are certified by Bat Conservation International.

Founded in 1982, Bat Conservation International’s mission is to conserve the world’s bats and their ecosystems to ensure a healthy planet.

 

Find out more about what makes Big Bat Houses a great bat house.

bat conservation international
north american bats

Testimonials

"It was very satisfying as a refuge manager to see our big bat house being used by tens of thousands of bats!  It provided a home for the bats, a pleasing sight to me and enjoyment for the public who came to see the nightly grand exit of the bats."

Kenneth Litzenberger
Southeast Louisiana Refuge Complex Manager
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

"My Big Bat House attracted a large colony of beneficial insect eating bats in less than a year, we love our bat house and watching the bats fly out each evening."

 

Blair Beauchamp
Diversified Farming Operator - Florida

"Micanopy loves the bat houses!! Thank you for making such cozy homes for these little mosquito-eating sky-puppies!"

Megan D'Andrea
Micanopy, Florida

What Makes a Great Bat House?

If you really want to be successful in attracting bats to your bat house one of the most important aspects is the construction and design of the bat house itself.  These days there are plenty of options for a potential bat house customer looking for a new bat house. Unfortunately many of the bat houses on the market are severely deficient in materials quality or of very poor design others are poorly built or way too small to be practical.  After spending 20 years designing bat houses I thought it would be a good idea to list the most important...

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These bats might be your neighbors!

Evening bat

The evening bat, Nycticeius humeralis, is an abundant bat throughout the southeastern United States, northward to the upper Midwest and Ontario. It ranges along the Atlantic seaboard south throughout Florida to Veracruz, Mexico. A true forest bat, the evening bat is almost never encountered in caves. It forms nursery colonies in hollow trees, behind loose bark, and sometimes in buildings…

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Mexican free-tailed bat

Mexican free-tailed bats, Tadarida brasiliensis, occupy a wide variety of habitats, ranging from desert communities through pinion-juniper woodland and pine-oak forests at elevations from sea level to 9,000 feet or more. The largest U.S. populations of free-tailed bats live in the West, with the densest concentrations found in Texas where they form maternity colonies numbering…

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Little Brown Bat

Comments Off on Little Brown Bat

Historically, the little brown myotis, Myotis lucifugus, was abundant throughout forested areas of the U.S. as far north as Alaska. It ranges from Alaska to Labrador and Newfoundland (Canada), south to southern California, northern Arizona, and northern New Mexico. In the West it is found mainly in mountainous and riparian areas in a wide variety of forest habitats; from tree-lined…

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Big Brown Bat

The big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, is found in virtually every American habitat ranging from timberline meadows to lowland deserts, though it is most abundant in deciduous forest areas. It is often abundant in suburban areas of mixed agricultural use. This species ranges from extreme northern Canada, throughout the United States and south to the…

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What Makes a Great Bat House?

If you really want to be successful in attracting bats to your bat house one of the most important aspects is the construction and design of the bat house itself.  These days there are plenty of options for a potential bat house customer looking for a new bat house. Unfortunately many of the bat houses on the market are severely deficient in materials quality or of very poor design others are poorly built or way too small to be practical.  After spending 20 years designing bat houses I thought it would be a good idea to list the most important...

Read More

More about bats

Have More Questions?

Let us know! Because all of our products are custom made, you always get the perfect fit.